Abaddon magazine

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Friday, September 17, 2021

Review: Lake Of Tears – Ominous

Label: AFM Records

Date: February 19th, 2021

It’s been a whole decade! Many will argue that it is unacceptable to leave so much time between albums in this day and age of attention-impaired audience. Day to day swarm of new releases has a tendency to swallow the band from the collective memory. Even with such a big name as Lake Of Tears.

On the other hand, there is a popular opinion that such thoughts must be eradicated in favor of quality music that often takes a longer time to form and develop correctly. I tend to agree with such opinions.

Truth be told, Lake Of Tears has been on a slight creative downfall with the last couple of records and the time off could only do good for the band.

And it did!

“Ominous” further progresses the sound of Lake Of Tears. The album does not take us all the way back to “Headstones” or “Forever Autumn”. Instead it keeps to the path the band has traced during the latter period of its career, while still keeping the recognizable seal of approval. At the same time it takes us further along the progression of the band’s creativity.

Now, the one thing I found wrong on the record is the versatility of individual tracks. Though majority of them keep to the homogenous line, there are a couple of songs that seem to strive further away the leading group. “At the Destination” for instance takes the listener to an industrialized gothic sound, in the vein of Sisters Of Mercy. “Ominous One” reminded me of Quorthon’s solo work and some of Viking era Bathory. The rest of the songs can be found bearing traces of the above mentioned influences, however, they keep more true to the overall idea of the album.

Still, the perspective of “Ominous” as a whole is fairly coherent. The recognizable mixture of gothic and doom metal, with added touches of progressive rock. As Daniel Brennare has almost three decades worth of experience in creating dark, oppressive and ominous feel to the music, there was to be no mistake in that regard. The album delivers everything Lake Of Tears has got us used to. It is melancholic, grim and almost threatening at times. You get a feeling Daniel has seen the end of the tunnel and there is no light to be found there. Hence, what you are left with is the hidden beauty of darkness with all its fears and wonders.

Lake Of Tears is unleashed. All the shackles are broken. The band is left to roam freely. Whether you will follow or expect some form of “Greater Art” to reappear is up to you. This one is not for the singles charts, or the best of compilations. “Ominous” is to be breathed in and out, having its traces keep you alive.