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Sunday, April 11, 2021

Review: Poema Arcanvs – Stardust Solitude

Label: Transcending Obscurity Records

Date: August 28th, 2020

I still come across opinions about Chile being an exotic destination when it comes to metal. Considering its location on the map, Europeans might find it hard to reach. But only as a tourist destination. As far as metal is concerned, Chile is neither exotic, nor a fresh bloom on the scene. Their roots are already very deep and the country has long provided us all with very tasty fruits.

Take Poema Arcanvs as an example. Over two decades of existence, not counting their previous incarnations. And “Stardust Solitude” is their sixth full length album. OK, there’s been almost eight years since the previous one, but the band is still here and gives out a record which should absolutely appeal to Europeans. Particularly to the British, as they have invented such musical expressions.

Doom metal, to be exact. Strongly rooted in the UK traditions, almost to a point of mere copycat. Luckily, with such an experience behind the band, they managed to stop just before they crossed the line. On the one hand, the Chileans follow the basics, set by the likes of Paradise Lost or Anathema on their early recordings. On the other hand, they keep to their own course by expelling all the unnecessary means. Precisely, they keep their music very much on the metal side of the specter. Poema Acranvs does not allow for their music to slip too far into the weeping melancholia. During almost a full hour of “Stardust Solitude” there is a lurking dose of weight to the performance. Much like a foreshadowing doom waiting to be unleashed. The solitude from the title is but waiting to be broken by the ever-present cosmic misbalance. Death metal side of Poema Arcanvs, though present, has quite a subtle effect on the release. As described above, it is out there, haunting the unsuspicious. More prominent of the ‘outside’ influences is sludge, thus displaying a more up-to-date tendencies of the band. However, the majority remains floating alongside the traditions of the genre.

In all honesty, it is hard for me to imagine “Stardust Solitude” achieving any sort of higher recognition for the band. Still, the Chileans’ ability to produce an album worthy of your time and money is commendable. Especially after all the time spent on the scene. It is probably not a coming gemstone of the genre, but a decent release worth a couple of spins, for sure.