Abaddon magazine

Music magazine

Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Review: Korpsesoturi – Korpskrist

Label: Xtreem Music

Date: October 22nd, 2020

Am I the only one constantly annoyed about the fact that I don’t know at least sixty languages? Not that Finnish language being growled would turn out to be understandable, but still… Somehow the mere fact I can only use two languages takes a piece of musical experience of any album not sung in those two. My fault absolutely, don’t get me wrong. By now I could have learned at least the most prominently used languages in metal. As Finnish certainly is. To make matters even worse, some of my favorite bands are coming from the shores of frozen northern lakes.

Korpsesoturi is quickly taking their position among my favorites. Not having listened to the previous efforts by the Finns, I can only say I’m pleasantly surprised. Especially considering the band is just six years old and most of what is heard on “Korpskrist” are the brainwaves of a single person. The sound itself comes from a long line of terribly underappreciated Finnish death metal bands. Abhorrence, Demilich, Demigod… None of them achieving higher recognition, as their colleagues from Sweden or USA, however being celebrated in the underground circles. Korpsesoturi is not your typical Finnish death metal commando, but they do carry enough of that oozing funeral chime to be placed among their country’s familiar soundscape.

Bone crushing brutality is the trademark of Korpsesoturi’s music. Be it laid in almost grinding speed or the doomy slowdowns, the band keeps piling up loads of weight on your shoulders. The sheer atmospheric impact connects them to their (in)famous countrymen. But, as I wrote earlier, the Finns also borrow quite a lot from across the pond. It is not only about the national traditions. To Florida and beyond, one could note. Technically advanced approach to creation could easily be construed as the legacy of Suffocation, Immolation, or even Deeds of Flesh in the faster parts. Now, when I speak about the more complex side of Korpsesoturi, don’t think of it as a matter of pure egoistic showmanship. The Finns use their capabilities as musicians to deepen the impact of that cryptic atmosphere. Occasional solo or the lurking lead guitar sharpen your senses to the coming of impending danger. Which then arrives in the form of destructive death metal force. There’s also that dynamic rhythmical layer that makes you feel as if in a first-person horror film, running from whatever unknown presence is right on your tail.

Hearing how “Korspkrist” unfolds within just 37 minutes makes you think about just how underrated Finnish death metal actually is. Korspesoturi’s new record might not be the highlight of the entire scene, but it is a damn good example. On a larger scale, in the oversaturated music world of today, Korpsesoturi finds its place well above the average. With support from the hyperactive Xtreem Music, the band could do wonders. And I do hope they will!